Turning Homeward:
Restoring Hope and Nature in the Urban Wild

by Adrienne Ross Scanlan



Mountaineers Books, 2016. ISBN 978-1-680-51062-1.
Reviewed by Susan J. Tweit
Posted on 03/29/2017

Nonfiction: Memoir; Nonfiction: Faith/Spirituality/Inspiration; Nonfiction: Nature/Place/Environment

As a girl growing up in the suburbs of New York City, Adrienne Ross Scanlan watched her father with the other men at Temple Zion, white prayer shawls over dark suits, "swaying and chanting their prayers." At home, she watched a different kind of movement as the tremors and other neuro-motor impacts of Parkinson's disease robbed her father of the ability to "rise from his Naugahyde recliner, walk into a room, hug his daughters, talk and laugh with friends..."

After her father died, Scanlan, by then an adult, sold her belongings, quit her job and moved West for a new start. She wound up in Seattle and began searching for her own form of healing in volunteer work to help restore the region's iconic salmon runs. She understood it as a way to practice the Jewish tradition of tikkum olam, a term that translates as ''repair of the world."

Turning Homeward chronicles what Scanlan learns about the complexities of both mending the world and living as a thoughtful and conscious human being. Her meditations on the meaning of tikkum olam, and the meaning of restoration in nature and in daily life apply to all of us. How can we as fallible human beings live with our flaws and the hurts we intentionally or not inflict on each other and the world? How do we live with the knowledge that even at our best, we cause pain and suffering, simply by being? We all eat, for example, and in the doing, we consume other lives. Even if we eat a purely plant-based diet, we eat plant embryos as we consume grain and beans, and plant flesh in roots like carrots or leaves like spinach. How do we atone for those impacts, unwitting or not?

For Scanlan, the answer is in practicing tikkum olam, consciously working to repair the world in whatever form we are called to:

The call to repair is genuine, arising from our best selves, I like to think, the part of all of us capable of acknowledging the harms we've crated without shrinking away in guilt or fear. There's no end to the damage we caused, just as there's no end to our curiosity, our capacity for good work, our intelligence, and our compassion. The reasons for despair are everywhere and profound. What's lost does matter. So does what's still here and what's still possible. ... Tikkun, I've come to learn, isn't identified by intentions but by the impact of what we hope are reparative actions.
Turning Homeward is a work of thoughtful atonement. Scanlan writes honestly and tenderly about what has not worked in mending her life, and the lives of salmon and urban streams, as well as what has. And out of despair at the havoc we have wreaked on this earth and each other, a quiet sense of hope grows in her words, the kind of active expectation of the results of conscious work that can in fact, lead to mending the wounds of the world and we humans.

Read an excerpt from this book.


For more than twenty years, Adrienne Ross Scanlan has volunteered as a citizen scientist monitoring salmon runs for local agencies, a restoration volunteer salvaging native pants and removing invasive weeds, and a docent at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle and Wolf Haven in Tenino, Washington. She is the recipient of a Seattle Arts Commission award and an Artist Trust Washington State Literature Fellowship. Visit her website.

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